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Your help needed- Memories of VE-Day sought

PUBLISHED: 10:48 11 February 2020 | UPDATED: 11:12 11 February 2020

Clarkes’ shop, Church Street, Cromer after a 1942 raid. Mr Clarke survived, but his wife was killed. The bomb had landed in front of Jarrold’ and bounced across the road. Picture: J Webster

Clarkes’ shop, Church Street, Cromer after a 1942 raid. Mr Clarke survived, but his wife was killed. The bomb had landed in front of Jarrold’ and bounced across the road. Picture: J Webster

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More memories of VE-Day in Cromer are being sought as part of the 75th anniversary commemorations of the end of the war in Europe.

The corner of Church Street and High Street after the 1942 raid. The stick of bombs across the town centre narrowly missed the church, with one either end of the building. Picture: :J WebsterThe corner of Church Street and High Street after the 1942 raid. The stick of bombs across the town centre narrowly missed the church, with one either end of the building. Picture: :J Webster

Cromer Town Council is already planning a major display, a waterfall of poppies, in the churchyard and volunteers have been preparing flowers.

Meanwhile, as part of the commemorations, the Friends of Cromer Museum wants people's help to add to the town records.

The honour roll in the church has the names of both service personnel and civilians killed in the conflict but in some instances very little has been recorded of their lives both before and during the war.

In addition to those involved in the forces, Cromer, Sheringham and Great Yarmouth were front-line towns, suffering from air attacks. The first air-raid with casualties in Cromer took place before the Blitz in London. Consequently, there were more civilian deaths than in many other places.

John ‘Jack’ Lynn - captain of a Wellington bomber, lost over enemy territory. Picture: Friends of Cromer MuseumJohn ‘Jack’ Lynn - captain of a Wellington bomber, lost over enemy territory. Picture: Friends of Cromer Museum

Peter Stibbons, chairman of the Friends of Cromer Museum, said: "The main thing we're after is to get people to go to the website and come forward with more photographs and family information.

"If you have memories or family accounts of those who died in the conflict, there is a chance to add to the stories that can be remembered on VE-Day. If you are a senior member of the community, perhaps you have direct recollection of those who were lost?

"If you had a father, grandfather or uncle who served, do you have a story which was handed down? If you had a great-grandfather who went to war, can you ask your parents or uncles and aunts if they can help put some recollections together? We'd be particularly pleased to add photographs to the listings."

To mark the occasion, the early May Bank Holiday has been moved from Monday, May 4 to Friday, May 8.

Clifford Abel - the son of Cromer'’s station master, who died as a prisoner of war in the Far East. Picture: Friends of Cromer MuseumClifford Abel - the son of Cromer'’s station master, who died as a prisoner of war in the Far East. Picture: Friends of Cromer Museum

Visit www.cromerdictionary.co.uk - click on the Second World War tab on the left, then click on 'Roll of Honour' and see how to send in stories. You can also drop a note in at the museum, marked as 'Friends of Cromer Museum'.

Reginald Larwood, who was lost when his flying boat went down off the Seychelles. Picture: Friends of Cromer MuseumReginald Larwood, who was lost when his flying boat went down off the Seychelles. Picture: Friends of Cromer Museum








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