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Cromer Crab featured on BBC’s The One Show - do you see it?

PUBLISHED: 16:01 26 September 2018 | UPDATED: 16:06 26 September 2018

Presenter Andy Kershaw, left, with fishermen John Davies and John Lee in a report about Cromer crab for the One Show. Picture: BBC

Presenter Andy Kershaw, left, with fishermen John Davies and John Lee in a report about Cromer crab for the One Show. Picture: BBC

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Cromer crab has just got a bit more famous after being featured on BBC1’s the One Show.

At sea for a report about Cromer crab for the One Show. Picture: BBCAt sea for a report about Cromer crab for the One Show. Picture: BBC

The delicacy the and business behind it were featured last night (Tuesday, September 25) in a segment titled The Final Catch, wedged in between appearances by Scottish Tory Ruth Davidson.

In the report, presenter Andy Kershaw joined an early morning crabbing trip with eighth generation Cromer fisherman John Davies, where they talked about the struggle to sustain the crabbing industry, which brings in £47 million a year.

Mr Kershaw said: “Fishermen here in north Norfolk say the number of professionals crabbing along this coast is dwindling, and unless a new, younger generation engages with the industry soon, it’ll die out as the old-timers retire.”

Mr Davies said of the recruitment difficulties: “A lot of it unsociable hours, a lot of it is that they aren’t brought up to work anymore, I don’t think.

Cromer crab in a report about Cromer crab for the One Show. Picture: BBCCromer crab in a report about Cromer crab for the One Show. Picture: BBC

“You’ve only got to look at the bigger boats, crewed by foreign workers because they can’t get the local people to do the job.”

Mr Kershaw said another obstacle facing the industry was the set-up costs for new businesses - to run a boat like Mr Davies’ a licence costing £30,000 is required, and that is before you pay for the boat, crab pots and everything else need.

Mr Kershaw also spoke to crew member Chris Clarke, 22, and after the boat returned to shore from five hours at sea catching 600 crabs, they welcomed aboard three “young, unemployed locals” to see if they could get a taste for the crabbing life.

Then it was off to the crab stall of fellow fisherman John Lee, where his daughter, Sam, dresses the crustaceans for sale.

Mr Kershaw then returned to the prom in front of the RNLI Henry Blogg Museum with Mr Davies and Mr Lee, where they enjoyed a crab sandwich.

However, the report seems to have skipped the scenes from Cromer’s Cliftonville Hotel, where chefs Paul Harvey and Jamie Hood spent hours preparing crab dishes for the benefit of the BBC’s cameras earlier this month.

The segment can be seen on BBC iPlayer here - scroll forward to 10:40 to go straight there.

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