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One of Britain’s most important religious art collections heads to north Norfolk

Cromer Methodist church wants to convert part of the main hall into a homeless pod, day centre and part church after the congregation drops to less than 30 people using the large main hall. Pictured from left 

Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

Cromer Methodist church wants to convert part of the main hall into a homeless pod, day centre and part church after the congregation drops to less than 30 people using the large main hall. Pictured from left Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

Archant Norfolk 2015

One of the Britain’s most important collections of modern religious art is coming to north Norfolk.

The Methodist Modern Art Collection will be on display in Cromer this summer, coinciding with the town’s carnival.

It will be on display at the Community Matters Cafe, Hall Road and the Methodist Church, West Street from August 7 to 17.

This unique collection of art featuring biblical themes and narrative has toured the UK and abroad since its inception over 50 years ago.

Local minister, Revd Sharon Willimott, commented: “It is a real privilege to have the Methodist Art Collection here in Cromer and we are particularly pleased to have it at Carnival time when so many extra visitors will come to town.

“In the works we have chosen we see clear connections between the life of Jesus among the forgotten and the outcast and the mission of Cromer Methodist Church (and the Foodbank that was seeded here). The regular visitors to the Community Matters Cafe will have a special preview and lunch on Monday 6th August.

“We will be complimenting the exhibition by art workshops and reflective sessions as well as traditional bible studies. It is our hope that the Methodist Modern Art Collection will provide an opportunity for a whole range of conversations about faith, Jesus and the human condition.

“The Workshops etc are free, open to all and no booking is required. In line with our usual practice all refreshments offered will be a gift of the church.”

The management of the collection is deputed to a body of trustees.

Their primary aim is to enable people to connect their faith to art but also to encourage people outside the Church to consider the Christian message presented through the medium of art.

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